Tagged: Clint Eastwood

Dirty Harry’s Brown Sportcoat in Magnum Force

Clint Eastwood as Inspector "Dirty Harry" Callahan in Magnum Force (1973).

Clint Eastwood as Inspector “Dirty Harry” Callahan in Magnum Force (1973).

Vitals

Clint Eastwood as Insp. Harry Callahan, badass San Francisco Police Department inspector

San Francisco, Late Summer 1972

Background

Magnum Force was originally developed by John Milius as Vigilance, a simple film about a group of young officers in the SFPD going rogue to exterminate the worst of the city’s crooks. Clint Eastwood quickly got his hands on the script and decided that the film would be a good vehicle to show that Harry Callahan may be harsh in his methods, but he isn’t a total vigilante who takes the law in his hands. (Although some would say the opposite about Eastwood during the film’s production.)

Due to Milius’ extensive knowledge and enthusiasm for firearms, the film included plenty of gun handling both on and off the job with extended scenes set during both practice and competition.

What’d He Wear?

Harry spends much of Magnum Force, including the climactic finale, wearing a brown herringbone sportcoat and slacks that are very appropriate for a late summer day in San Francisco (and a fall day anywhere else). This outfit, especially given some of the countrified elements incorporated into the sportcoat’s design, would also be fine for a jaunt to the countryside and reflects a ’70s version of the similar hacking jacket and cavalry twill trousers worn by Sean Connery in Goldfinger.

The single-breasted sport jacket is brown herringbone wool with very wide notch lapels and a comfortably long fit. The lapels are a bit large, even for 1973 standards, and this would have been especially detrimental on a shorter man than Harry. Luckily for the era’s fashions, Clint Eastwood’s 6’4″ height keeps the large lapels from looking overwhelming.

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The jacket has natural shoulders with roped sleeveheads and a long single vent in the rear. Edge stitching is visible throughout.

Both the 3-button front and the 2-button cuffs consist of brown leather knots. The only outer pockets are the two hip pockets with large flaps.

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Other rustic elements of Harry’s sportcoat are the double-stitched front and rear yokes, cutting horizontally across the chest (and presumably preventing the addition of a breast pocket) and slightly dipping in the rear to resemble a Western-style point.

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Harry’s standard shirt with this jacket is a long-sleeve taupe dress shirt with large spread collars and rounded button cuffs. The front is plain with no placket, but there is a squared breast pocket.

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Harry’s silk necktie is fashionably wide for the era. It has a maroon ground with a repeating pattern of small gold capsules insulating blue designs. The tie’s inner lining is a bright red silk, and the manufacturer is indicated on the black tag with gold lettering. Unfortunately, the tag is only seen briefly in a relatively far shot, so recognition would be difficult for all but the most eagle-eyed viewers.

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The first time he wears this sportcoat in the film, though, it is with a sky blue shirt. This shirt is similarly styled to the other with large spread collars and rounded button cuffs. The silk necktie is also wide, but it is a busier pattern with large light blue floral wreaths encircling a yellow-cream floral center, all smattered onto a dark navy ground.

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Harry’s trousers do not contrast much with his jacket, colored in neutral mink. They are flat front and rise high on his waist. The side pockets are slanted, and the jetted rear pockets close with buttons.

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Harry keeps his pants up with a thick dark brown leather belt with a dulled brass clasp. Evidently, the belt is thick enough to fasten onto his massive shoulder holster. The trousers have plain-hemmed bottoms that break short over his feet.

His shoes are a pair of very well-worn dark brown leather plain-toe bluchers with black laces and black leather soles. Harry wears a pair of dark brown ribbed socks that nearly match the color of the shoes.

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A manufacturer’s logo is visible on the heels of Harry’s shoes, but I’m not shoe-literate enough to recognize it in a blur.

Read his shoes.

Read his shoes.

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Eastwood, behind takes in San Francisco, looking notably badass with his holstered Smith & Wesson.

Harry appears to have updated his holster for the second film, now wearing a brown soft leather holster slung low under his left armpit for a quick right-hand draw. It fastens to both sides of his belt and the leather straps are secured over his shoulders with white nylon cord.

Although most shoulder holsters suspend their weapon near the mid-chest, the size of Harry’s massive .44 Magnum necessitates it being worn closer to the hip. A traditional hip holster – worn cavalry-style a la Wild Bill Hickok – would have the same effect, but it would cause some very intense sagging on Harry’s belt as the 6″-barreled Smith & Wesson Model 29 weighs nearly three pounds.

Harry usually wears a watch during his adventures, but he appears to have forgone it for Magnum Force.

Harry has a clear preference for sport jackets and blazers, wearing them for his everyday work and only saving suits for special occasions. Off-duty, he tends to wear very cop-like windbreakers with polos and trousers.

Harry wears the same shirt and trousers with a dark brown blazer earlier in the film during the failed grocery store holdup.

Go Big or Go Home

Although he earned much of his reputation from his shooting, Harry also shows a proficiency behind the wheel. It may not be Car Week just yet, but I’d like to look at some of the classic Fords that Harry drives during the film.

Harry’s SFPD duty car is a brown, unmarked 1972 Ford Galaxie 500. The Galaxie 500 was the mid-range sedan for Ford, a slightly upscale version of the dark brown ’71 Ford Custom 500 that Burt Reynolds drove in White Lightning.

Harry’s Galaxie 500 has a V8 engine – likely the most common 351 cubic inch engine – paired with Ford’s SelectShift automatic transmission. It is fitted with California license plates 650 MTW.

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Harry’s personal car is an electric blue 1972 Ford LTD 2-door convertible with a white soft top roof. I wouldn’t suspect that a guy like Harry would drive a convertible, but he does have a sporty side. If the Custom was Ford’s base model and the Galaxie was mid-range, the LTD was the top luxury model of Ford’s line. Like the Galaxie sedan, Harry’s LTD likely has a 351 cubic inch V8 engine and the SelectShift automatic transmission. It’s worth noting that 1972 was the final year for the LTD convertible as many manufacturers began phasing out convertibles during the mid-’70s.

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Harry also knows his way around a motorcycle, zipping around on a Triumph T 100 Tiger 500cc presumably taken from a downed motorcycle cop during the final scenes. The bulk of the film featured the patrolmen on 1972 Moto Guzzi Eldorado V7 850 Police Special bikes, but Eastwood found the Triumph to be more maneuverable.

How to Get the Look

With the exception of the tie, Harry’s outfit is predominantly brown – a serious color for a serious man. Brown was especially popular in the ’70s and reflects Harry’s direct sartorial backlash against the psychedelic color palette preferred by the hippie culture of the ’60s.

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  • Brown herringbone wool single-breasted sportcoat with large notch lapels, 3-leather knot button front, flapped hip pockets, 2-leather knot button cuffs, and long single vent
  • Mink flat front trousers with belt loops, slanted side pockets, button-through jetted rear pockets, and plain-hemmed bottoms
  • Taupe button-down shirt with large spread collar, placket-less front, squared breast pocket, rounded button cuffs
  • Maroon silk necktie with repeating gold-and-blue capsule design
  • Dark brown leather belt with dulled brass clasp
  • Dark brown leather bluchers with black laces and black leather soles
  • Dark brown ribbed socks
  • Light brown leather shoulder holster (RHD) for a Smith & Wesson Model 29 revolver

The Gun

Does anyone really not know what type of gun Harry carried? Right up there with James Bond’s Walther PPK, Harry Callahan’s Smith & Wesson Model 29 is one of the few guns that even non-enthusiasts know by heart. Harry’s Model 29 is blued with a 6.5″ barrel and rosewood grips. Although it gained much notoriety as a “.44 Magnum”, Harry actually implies that he uses .44 Special loads instead when he tells the motorcycle cops:

It’s a light Special. This size gun it gives you better control and less recoil than a .357 Magnum with waductters.

While it might be slightly more practical to carry a .44 Special than a .44 Magnum in a heavily urban environment like San Francisco, the film’s aficionado writer John Milius explained in the 2008 DVD release that the line was misinterpreted and actually meant that Harry used a specially prepared lighter Magnum load, perhaps even reloaded by Harry himself.

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Harry hands his .44 off to Deep Throat.

Magnum Force includes the first instance of Harry losing his Model 29. After he hands it over to the crooked Lieutenant Briggs, Harry is unable to retrieve the Model 29 from Briggs’ car, and it is likely destroyed when the car explodes.

Do Yourself a Favor and…

Buy the movie. Keep an eye out for Clint’s stunt double too.

Jon Lovitz?

Jon Lovitz?

The Quote

A man’s got to know his limitations.

Dirty Harry’s Windbreaker in The Enforcer

Clint Eastwood as Inspector "Dirty Harry" Callahan in The Enforcer (1976), the third film of the Dirty Harry series.

Clint Eastwood as Inspector “Dirty Harry” Callahan in The Enforcer (1976), the third film of the Dirty Harry series.

Vitals

Clint Eastwood as Insp. Harry Callahan, reassigned San Francisco inspector

San Francisco, Summer 1976

Background

After receiving the news that his friend, Inspector Frank DiGiorgio (played by Robert Mitchum’s brother John Mitchum), has been mortally wounded in a gunfight with Patty Hearst-like thugs, Harry immediately heads to the hospital like any good friend would.

It becomes one of the few days in cinema history that begins with visiting a friend in the hospital and ends with holding a bomber at gunpoint in a church pew… with some rocket launcher testing in between.

What’d He Wear?

Harry’s off duty attire is a very masculine ensemble consisting of a light gray windbreaker and shirt with dark slacks. It is a smart outfit that is practical for an action-oriented guy who isn’t sure just where the day will lead him with enough layers to remain comfortable in San Francisco’s cool climate. Harry’s look is – like him – not very flashy; it’s just fashionable enough to keep him from standing out too much without getting too ’70s about things (i.e. his suede jacket in the finale, which is dated but still pretty cool.)

The windbreaker is made of a synthetic rainproof material – likely canvas – in a very warm light gray that appears almost cream-like under the sun. In lieu of a standard collar, this jacket has an elastic ribbed standing collar – much like one would find on a baseball jacket – of dark green fabric.

It zips down the front with a silver bar tab. The dark green tape on the right side of the zipper matches the collar while the red tape on the left provides a contrast.

Harry, zipped and unzipped.

Harry, zipped and unzipped.

The jacket has four exterior pockets, with a button-flapped patch pocket on each side of the chest and slash side pockets for Harry’s hands. Edge stitching is visible throughout the jacket, notably on the chest pockets and the cuffs. The cuffs fasten with a single button on a pointed tab, but Harry leaves his unfastened.

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This is what happens when Harry Callahan goes to church.

Unlike a blouson jacket, there is no ribbing on the waistline and cuffs. Thus, the jacket doesn’t “puff” over the waist like a blouson. Harry’s windbreaker thus has a large, square fit that allows him to easily carry his sizable firearm under his jacket. The short vents on the right and left sides extend up to the waist for additional comfort.

Harry’s shirt is also light gray, but there is a slight contrast between this gray and the warmer gray of the jacket. The shirt has a point collar that Harry wears open. It has white buttons down a front placket, and the mitred cuffs fasten with a single button.

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Although certain elements give it a dated look, Harry’s casual attire is far more timeless than his boss’ super-’70s sportcoat, shirt, and tie.

Harry wears a pair of dark brown flat front trousers with jetted rear pockets and then-fashionable frogmouth front pockets. Harry wears a brown leather belt with a brass oval clasp through the trouser belt loops. Harry’s large light brown leather shoulder holster clips to his belt on both the right and left sides, with the .44 Magnum itself being carried under Harry’s left arm for a right-hand-draw.

A shoulder holster isn't the best concealment method for such a short-length jacket, but Harry is pretty much famous for his gun so I don't think he's actually trying to conceal anything.

A shoulder holster isn’t the best concealment method for a large revolver and such a short-length jacket, but Harry is pretty much famous for his gun so I don’t think he’s actually trying to conceal anything.

The trouser bottoms are plain-hemmed with a short break over his shoes.

Harry’s footwear in this casual dress sequence is a pair of brown suede 3-eyelet chukka boots with black leather soles. His socks appear to be dark blue, which doesn’t make much sense given the brown footwear and trousers, but:

a) I could be mistaken.
b) Harry doesn’t really give two shits about sartorial rules.

If you have to leap into action in a moment's notice, you want to be wearing the right shoes.

If you have to leap into action in a moment’s notice, you want to be wearing the right shoes.

For the M72 LAW rocket launcher demonstration, Harry wears a pair of the brown tortoiseshell plastic-framed “sport” aviators that were very popular in this era. Pretty much any man who lived in the late ’70s and early ’80s had a pair of these sunglasses, from straitlaced conservative cops like Harry to volatile Cuban-born cocaine kingpins like Tony Montana.

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Harry’s wristwatch is stainless with a round case and an expanding bracelet. The black dial has a faded white center.

Although the focal point of this shot is clearly meant to be Harry's massive .44 Magnum, it also offers one of the better shots of his watch.

Although the focal point of this shot is clearly meant to be Harry’s massive .44 Magnum, it also offers one of the better shots of his watch.

How to Get the Look

Though it wouldn’t be my first choice for a night out, off-duty Harry offers some practical sartorial choices for a day of running errands or chasing hoods.

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  • Light gray zip-front synthetic windbreaker with dark green ribbed collar, green and red zipper tape, button-flapped chest patch pockets, slash side pockets, 1-button cuffs, and short side vents
  • Light gray button-down shirt with large point collars, front placket, and mitred button cuffs
  • Dark brown flat front trousers with frogmouth front pockets, jetted rear pockets, and plain-hemmed bottoms
  • Brown leather belt with brass oval clasp
  • Brown suede 3-eyelet chukka boots
  • Dark blue ribbed socks
  • Stainless wristwatch on an expanding bracelet with a round black faded-center dial
  • Light brown leather shoulder holster (RHD) for a Smith & Wesson Model 29 revolver

The Gun

If you don’t know this by now

Do Yourself a Favor and…

Buy the movie.

The Quote

Mustapha: You really are a dirty bastard, ain’t you, Harry?
Harry: The dirtiest.

Dirty Harry’s Brown Suit

Clint Eastwood in the climactic scene of Dirty Harry.

Clint Eastwood in the climactic scene of Dirty Harry.

After stuffing our faces and stomachs during the Thanksgiving holiday this weekend, it’s certainly appropriate that you’d want to return to work feeling like a badass. That’s what Clint Eastwood is here for.

Vitals

Clint Eastwood as Insp. Harry Callahan, frustrated San Francisco inspector

San Francisco, Summer 1971

Background

Having established his central look earlier in the film as a sport coat and slacks (gray herringbone and brown plaid), Dirty Harry throws a lateral for the final confrontation against the brutal “Scorpio Killer” by wearing a sharp, slim cut brown three-piece suit.

A brown 3-piece suit is a very traditional look, but the fit and styling of Harry’s suit is very contemporary and fashion-forward for 1971. The traditional suiting makes sense for Harry, a contrast to the more liberal film cops like Bullitt and their more fashionable wardrobes. While not outfitted in a frock coat and striped cravat, Harry still looks more old-fashioned next to Bullitt in his shooting jacket and polo neck jumper.

What’d He Wear?

Harry dresses warmly throughout the film, almost always wearing a jacket, trousers, and vest, so it makes sense that when he wears a suit, it would be a three-piece. Harry’s suit is brown, a strong choice for Harry that evokes a reliable and masculine look, blending in with the earth around him during the final scene.

Dry cleaning bills for a guy like Harry must be a bitch.

Dry cleaning bills for a guy like Harry must be a bitch.

Harry’s dark brown suit, unless someone knows better, appears to be polyester. This being 1971, polyester is a reasonable choice as the ’70s are often known sartorially as “the polyester decade”. If you don’t believe me, just watch Saturday Night Fever or Mean Streets. The length of the vents and the swelled edges on the lapels and pockets are also indicative of this era.

The suit jacket is single-breasted – Harry doesn’t seem like a double-breasted guy, does he? – with three very dark brown horn buttons down the front. Harry wears the center button fastened.

Harry's buttoned coat keeps his vest buttons and belt a mystery for viewers... a mystery that will likely never be solved.

Harry’s buttoned coat keeps his vest buttons and belt a mystery for viewers… a mystery that will likely never be solved.

The jacket has a welted breast pocket, straight flapped hip pockets, notch lapels, and a vertical seam down the rear center. The natural shoulders of the jacket look strong on Eastwood’s athletic profile.

Additional style touches include very long double rear vents and widely-spaced 2-button cuffs, which aren’t seen very much anymore.

"Hands up, Clint!"

“Hands up, Clint!”

Since Harry wears his jacket with the center button closed during the entire sequence, we only see the top and bottom of the vest. It buttons with a single-breasted style down the front and has swelled edges and a notched bottom.

The flat front trousers have belt loops and cuffed bottoms with narrow turn-ups that are possibly no longer than 1″ wide. Again, due to the jacket’s closure, we don’t see much of the waistline, but it looks like Harry wears a black leather belt. This would clash with Harry’s shoes, but:
a) We don’t really see the belt because of the jacket.
b) Do you think Harry Callahan gives a shit if his belt and shoes match?

On that note, Harry’s shoes are dark brown leather plain-toe bluchers, worn with a pair of dark brown socks that continue the leg line. Due to all of his running around in the quarry, Harry’s shoes accumulate a ton of dust and look much more like a dirty brown than a dark brown by the time he has Scorpio at gunpoint on the pier.

While I can't speak from personal experience, plain-toe bluchers seem to be the shoe to wear when riding on top of a school bus.

While I can’t speak from personal experience, plain-toe bluchers seem to be the shoe to wear when riding on top of a school bus.
And, of course, this is another great composite of Clint Eastwood holding a gun on himself.

Harry’s white dress shirt has fashionably – but not excessively – large collars, a front placket, and squared buttoned cuffs. His patterned tie is knotted widely – but again, not excessively wide – and has a very dark brown ground with a lighter red and brown floral pattern spotted throughout.

Harry's tie nicely matches the bruises on his face. Keep this in mind if you're in a more aggressive profession.

Harry’s tie nicely matches the bruises on his face. Keep this in mind if you’re in a more aggressive profession.

His accessories are the usual for him, including the black plastic Ray-Ban Balorama wraparound sunglasses and his stainless Timex analog watch with a round white face and an expanding bracelet.

His style is simple but classy, with a stainless watch and his Ray-Bans adding small but noticeable touches to an outfit.

His style is simple but classy, with a stainless watch and his Ray-Bans adding small but noticeable touches to an outfit.


Go Big or Go Home

At this point in Dirty Harry, it’s fair to feel bad for Harry. After all, he spent the bulk of the film doing what no one was able to do, chasing down the ruthless Scorpio Killer and finally catching up with him. Furthermore, Harry actually managed to make the brutal serial killer feel the pain he deserved, rather than just slapping the cuffs on him. Of course, Harry’s forced interrogation – standing on Scorpio’s wounded leg – and his disregard for Scorpio’s fourth amendment rights led to the killer being released. As Harry warns, Scorpio indeed strikes again, this time kidnapping a school bus full of children. The only thing that gets in his way is Dirty Harry.

While this is likely not a position you’ll find yourself in every day, Harry’s dedication to his work is admirable. No one watches Dirty Harry and says, “Boy, he was a little too rough with that serial killer!” We’re all on Harry’s side. Whether you’re a banker or a barista, bring that sort of passion to your work everyday.

How to Get the Look

Harry’s look is simple and smart. If you’re the type of guy that can pull off brown – I mean, a lot of brown – this is the suit for you.

  • dhsuit-crop1Dark brown polyester three-piece suit, consisting of:
    • Single-breasted jacket with notch lapels, 3-button front, 2-button cuffs, welted breast pocket, straight flapped pockets, and long double rear vents
    • Single-breasted vest
    • Flat front trousers with belt loops and cuffed bottoms
  • White long-sleeve button-down dress shirt with large spread collars, front placket, and buttoned cuffs
  • Dark brown patterned tie
  • Dark brown leather plain-toe bluchers
  • Dark brown dress socks
  • Black leather belt
  • Ray-Ban Balorama black plastic wraparound sunglasses
  • Timex wristwatch with an expanding stainless bracelet and a round white face
  • Light brown shoulder holster (RHD) for a Smith & Wesson Model 29 revolver

The Gun

Harry’s sidearm is his tool of justice and has become one of the most iconic weapons in film history. It is, famously, a .44 Magnum revolver. The Smith & Wesson Model 29, the weapon used by Harry, was first developed in 1955 and named two years later when S&W began numbering their models. Sales of the .44 Magnum were slow during its first 16 years, but when Clint Eastwood armed himself with one in Dirty Harry, sales jumped through the roof. Sporting goods stores that had previously only sold the Model 29 to a few hunters and sport shooters couldn’t keep the gun in stock.

A Smith & Wesson Model 29 with the barrel, as carried by Clint Eastwood in Dirty Harry.

A long-barreled Smith & Wesson Model 29, as carried by Clint Eastwood in Dirty Harry. This image is on the incredibly resourceful IMFDB site.

Although the gun made an impression on viewers in Harry’s first scene, it was Harry’s handling of it in the final scene (“Do I feel lucky?”) that cemented the gun – and the character – in the minds of viewers. It also cemented a famous misquoting of the line (“Do you feel lucky, punk?”) in the mouths of viewers.

Although, staring down the barrel of this, audiences were probably a bit too intimidated to remember exactly what it was Harry said.

Although, staring down the barrel of this, audiences were probably a bit too intimidated to remember exactly what it was Harry said.

John Milius, who wrote the initial draft of the screenplay, recalls having the exact gun in mind for the film:

I remember that was one of the first movies where I made them give me a gun. I had this gun in mind, I knew where this gun was. I made them give me a $2,000 gun, I remember. I had to have the gun, and they said, “We’ll send for the gun.” I said, “No, you don’t understand. If I don’t have the gun today, when the gun comes here, I’ll have to stop everything just to look at it for a whole day, and that will slow everything up.” So they sent a limo for the gun, or a station wagon or something, for the gun. Brought the gun over, a wonderful gun. Unfortunately, I traded it off over the years. I looked at the gun for the rest of the day, then I started the thing and wrote it in 21 days. And that’s Dirty Harry.

It’s a shame that Milius, who firmly cemented the .44 Magnum’s place in cinematic history, was uncredited for his work, especially as Milius was the author of the “Do I feel lucky?” monologue. However, Milius received his due when he was given one of the Model 29s actually used in the production of Dirty Harry and Magnum Force. If you know anything about John Milius, you know that he’d probably rather have the gun than the credit anyway.

Do Yourself A Favor And…

Buy the movie.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSfkoFA7UCY

The Quote

I know what you’re thinking, punk. You’re thinking “did he fire six shots or only five?” Now, to tell you the truth, I forgot myself in all this excitement. But, being this is a .44 Magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world and will blow you head clean off, you’ve gotta ask yourself a question… “Do I feel lucky?” Well, do ya, punk?

dhsuit-lucky1

Dirty Harry’s Brown Plaid Sportcoat

Clint Eastwood as Insp. "Dirty Harry" Callahan in Dirty Harry.

Clint Eastwood as Insp. “Dirty Harry” Callahan in Dirty Harry.

Vitals

Clint Eastwood as Insp. Harry Callahan, renegade San Francisco inspector

San Francisco, Summer 1971

Background

As mentioned in the previous Dirty Harry post, many travelers are fooled into thinking that San Francisco’s climate is reflective of California as immortalized by the Beach Boys. Instead, the city enjoys cooler Mediterranean-style weather with dry summers and mild winters.

Travelers unaware of the fact that they’ll be enjoying a summer with evenings that can dip into the 40s (Fahrenheit) are easily spotted by their brightly-colored hoodies emblazened with the name “SAN FRANCISCO” on the front, newly purchased from an enterprising street vendor rightly taking advantage of ill-informed tourists.

Harry Callahan defines his distinctive look in the early scenes of Dirty Harry, putting a patterned sportcoat over a sweater vest and tie, matching it all with a pair of comfortable and casual slacks. While the look may suggest “I failed as a writer and settled as a science teacher”, Eastwood’s gritty gaze and the .44 Magnum in his holster say different.

What’d He Wear?

Harry struts into the office on the second day of his investigation in a well-matched sportcoat, sweater vest, tie, and slacks.

The dark brown sportcoat has a triple overcheck in a lighter shade of brown. The jacket avoids ’70s excess by keeping the notch lapels to a standard width without swelled edges. The blazer has a 2-button front and 2-button cuffs, both sets in dark brown. The sportcoat also has double rear vents and slanted flapped hip pockets.

Underneath, Eastwood wears a soft lighter brown sweater vest with a V-shaped opening, placed high on his chest. The vest is paired with a standard white shirt with long point collars and buttoned barrel cuffs. The necktie is a dark chocolate brown ground with a large pink-and-white dot pattern. The large collars and wide necktie are Eastwood’s only concessions to ’70s excess. Likely aware of the fad and unwilling to battle with the costumers, Eastwood wisely wears a sweater vest to cover the “Hello, it’s 1971!” style of shirt and tie.

heres a caption about clint!

Forty years before sharing a stage with an empty chair, Clint worked with actual co-stars.

Eastwood’s flat front pants are mink-colored, appearing to gain an olive shade under the heavy police lights of a night scene. They have belt loops, a sharp crease down the front center of each leg, and cuffed bottoms. The belt is medium brown leather with a brass rounded clasp. This belt attaches to Harry’s large light brown shoulder holster, suspending his .44 Magnum Smith & Wesson Model 29 revolver just under his left armpit.

On his feet, Harry wears a pair of brown leather laced dress shoes and very thin black dress socks.

trousers

The glamorous side of police work.

Harry’s single accessory is his stainless Timex wristwatch with a thin expanding bracelet and round white face.

After a long day and night of unintentionally spying on large topless women and mocking a potential suicide jumper before punching him in the face, Harry switches out his shirt for another full day at the office. This shirt is the same style as the previous with long wide-spread collars and buttoned barrel cuffs, but is sky blue in color and worn without the sweater vest.

Harry knows when a sweater vest has been played out.

Harry knows when a sweater vest has been played out.

Go Big or Go Home, Hammerhead

To read about Harry’s American values and standards, check out the last Dirty Harry article. Right now, it’s essential to focus on the quintessential Eastwood road rage scene:

(Not the best quality, evidently some guy just filmed it from his TV…)

There’s just something great about Eastwood responding to some guy (MAN #2, according to the subtitles) as “Hammerhead” when you’ve heard so much worse from your dad.

How to Get the Look

DH-BrnPl1-PUBHarry dresses practically, leaving room for being diverse. If he gets a shirt dirty, he wants to be able to change it without thinking, “Oh, no, how will this ever match the tie I picked out?” Just picture Clint Eastwood standing in front of his closet, hand on hip, two seconds away from a tantrum because he just can’t find the right jacket for this outfit.

  • Dark brown (w/ lighter brown triple overcheck) single-breasted 2-button sportcoat with notch lapels, 2-button cuffs, slanted flapped hip pockets, and double rear vents
  • White button-down shirt with long point collars and buttoned barrel cuffs, or sky blue if the white one gets dirty
  • Mink-colored flat front slacks with side pockets, belt loops, and cuffed bottoms
  • Light brown V-neck sweater vest
  • Dark brown necktie with large pink-and-white dot pattern throughout
  • Brown leather belt with a brass squared clasp
  • Thin black dress socks
  • Brown leather laced dress shoes
  • Timex wristwatch with an expanding stainless bracelet and a round white face
  • Lawman Leather Goods light brown shoulder holster (RHD) for a Smith & Wesson Model 29 revolver

The Gun

We’ve been over this.

DH-BrnPl1-Gun1

Do Yourself a Favor and…

Buy the movie and stay out of Clint Eastwood’s way.

The Quote

Now you know why they call me Dirty Harry. Every dirty job that comes along…

Dirty Harry’s Red Sweater Vest

Clint Eastwood as one of his most iconic roles, Dirty Harry.

Vitals

Clint Eastwood as Insp. Harry Callahan, renegade San Francisco inspector

San Francisco, Summer 1971

Background

Voted the “Greatest Movie Badass of All-Time” in a 2009 poll for MTV News, the character of Harry Callahan was originally much different. Although still a tough cop chasing a serial killer with a .44 Magnum, the role was originally envisioned as an older New York City policeman that was gunned down by a sniper during the finale. Offered first to Frank Sinatra, whose wrist injury from The Manchurian Candidate prevented him from firing the .44, then to John Wayne, who refused to accept one of Sinatra’s rejected roles and later proved his regret by starring in McQ, Clint Eastwood was finally offered the role.

One of my first posts was about a similar San Francisco inspector who plays by his own rules. However, Bullitt and Dirty Harry are two very different policemen: both have their own methods and are disliked by superiors, but where Bullitt is more free-wheeling and liberal, Callahan is shoot-first, ask-later and considerably anti-crime.

This change is reflected in their wardrobes as well. Bullitt prefers a casual look, layering a trench coat over a sportcoat and sweater. Callahan, the more conservative cop, wears a sportcoat and slacks also, but with a necktie and sweater vest. Interestingly, and perhaps not too coincidental, Rick Santorum sported sweater vests when he was an early contender for the Republican presidential nomination in 2012. Perhaps Santorum felt that channeling a conservative hero would make him more appealing? (And that’s as political as this blog will ever get.)

What’d He Wear?

As mentioned in the Bullitt post, San Francisco is not a place for T-shirts and shorts. Callahan smartly layers up with a sportcoat and sweater vest over his tie and slacks.

The sportcoat is a gray single-breasted herringbone tweed coat with dark elbow patches. There are 3 buttons in the front and 2 on each cuff. Harry often closes the middle button of the coat over his sweater. It has a long single vent in the back. Despite being from the 1970s, Harry’s sportcoat is not very dated, with only mild swelled edges and standard lapel sizes.

Harry’s best side must be his left side?

Harry’s sweater vest is a burgundy, which shines a bright red in some light. He matches it with a Guards necktie in burgundy and navy, with thick left-shoulder-down-to-right-hip British-style stripes. His shirt is a pale blue with button cuffs and a spread collar.

Clint Eastwood won the Academy Award for Best Steely Gaze in 1971.

Evidently, Harry is very choosy about his pants, a pair of slim cut charcoal wool trousers with side pockets, belt loops, and cuffed bottoms. After getting some buckshot in his leg, Harry is given the option to have his pants cut off or painfully remove them himself. When the doctor warns him that the latter option will hurt, Harry shows that a BAMF can be frugal as well: “$29.50, let it hurt.” That would be just under $170 in 2012 dollars.

Strangely, although buckshot damaged his leg and got his blood on his $29.50 pants, there were no rips or damage at all to the actual pants. Movie magic?

Harry wears a black leather belt with a gold clasp. It is this belt that assists with Harry’s most famous piece of attire: the massive light brown leather shoulder holster for his Smith & Wesson .44 Magnum revolver. The holster was made by Bucheimer-Clark and copies made by Lawman Leather Goods are still for sale on their page (http://www.lawmanleathergoods.com/close.html).

If you’re not wearing your shoulder holster when you go to your doctor’s, you’re DOING IT WRONG.

On his feet, Harry wears a pair of black leather dress shoes with laces and black socks.

Harry’s few accessories are minimalist, practical, and good quality. His Timex watch is stainless with a thin stainless expanding bracelet and a white face.

The recoil from Harry’s .44 gives us a look at his watch, cuffs, and elbow patches. Aren’t we lucky, punks?

Finally, the most stylish part of Harry’s wardrobe are his Ray-Ban Balorama sunglasses. Still manufactured, Harry wears these classic black sunglasses with gray polarized lenses when investigating the opening crime scene.

Harry in his Ray-Bans.

Go Big or Go Home

One word that can be used to describe Harry is American. He has a clean and classic American look, even wearing red and blue like the American flag. His gun – and a big one at that – is a Smith & Wesson, an American manufacturer dating to the 1850s. His car is a midnight sapphire 1968 Ford Custom, a no-frills sedan with a powerful V8 engine that would beat any standard four-cylinder rice-burner on the roads today.

And, of course, this opening sequence introduces us to Harry’s “usual lunch” – a hot dog on a bun. Despite its German origins, hot dogs are now regarded as an American staple, seen at picnics, ballgames, and cookouts.

To be “Dirty Harry” Callahan, you just need to be American.

The best opportunity Dirty Harry has for relaxation is when buckshot is being removed from his leg. Naturally.

How to Get the Look

Harry manages to pull off this look – very prep school and conservative in other settings – like a BAMF would and not just because he’s Clint Eastwood. He walks with confidence and assurance, wearing what he does because it is practical and comfortable and not to make a fashion statement. The unpopular choice of a sweater vest is also offset by the .44 Magnum strapped to it.

  • Gray herringbone tweed 3-button sportcoat with notch lapels, slight swelled edges, jetted breast pocket, flapped hip pockets, a long single vent, dark right and left elbow patches
  • Pale blue button-down shirt with a spread collar and 1-button barrel cuffs
  • Charcoal pleated slacks with side pockets, belt loops, and cuffed bottoms
  • Burgundy red sweater vest
  • Guards necktie in burgundy and navy, with thick left-shoulder-down-to-right-hip British-style stripes
  • Black leather belt with a gold clasp
  • Black dress socks
  • Black leather laced dress shoes
  • Ray-Ban Balorama sunglasses
  • Timex wristwatch with an expanding stainless bracelet and a white face
  • Bucheimer-Clark light brown shoulder holster (RHD) with a sewn yoke, tension screw, and narrow belt strap, to carry a Smith & Wesson Model 29 revolver

The Gun

Dirty Harry’s Smith & Wesson Model 29, a .44 Magnum revolver with an 8 ⅜” barrel, is his iconic weapon quoted as “the most powerful handgun in the world”. The .44 Magnum cartridge was initially developed by Elmer Keith for Smith & Wesson. The Model 29 was introduced the same year as an item in Smith & Wesson’s large N-framed series. The official “Model 29″ nomenclature was designated two years later. The Model 29 is a double action revolver with a six-round cylinder and has been offered with 3″, 4″, 5″, 6″, 6½”, 8⅜” and, later, 10⅝” barrel lengths. It had value amongst handgun enthusiasts and some hunters throughout the first sixteen years of its existence, but with Dirty Harry‘s release in 1971, it became wildly popular and shops had trouble keeping it in stock.

A Smith & Wesson Model 29 with the 8 ⅜”barrel, as carried by Clint Eastwood in Dirty Harry.

In this first film, Harry carries his 6 ½”-barreled S&W Model 29 in a light brown leather Bucheimer-Clark right-handed draw shoulder holster with a sewn yoke, tension screw, and narrow belt strap. The rights were purchased by Jerry Ardolino in the 1970s after the company folded. Lawman Leather Goods produces a high quality similar holster although it has a laced yoke, no tension screw, and a wide “cobra head” belt strap. The rumors of an 8 ⅜” barrel or different caliber models being used in “Dirty Harry” are untrue, although 8 ⅜” barrels were used in some publicity photos. (Thanks to Jim Tusing and Max Simmons, two great followers of this blog, for the information.)

From the imfdb article on Dirty Harry:

As the script originally called for a Smith & Wesson Model 29 with a 4″ barrel, this eventually proved troublesome for the filmmakers, since the Model 29 was no longer in production at the time. Before shooting began, Eastwood contacted Bob Sauer (then a representative for Smith & Wesson) to acquire the gun for the film. It was a challenge, but Fred Miller at the plant had a couple assembled from parts eventually. To better familiarize himself with the weapon’s handling and recoil, Eastwood took one to a gun range and fired live rounds through it. Unlike the gun in the script, the only barrels acquired for the guns in this film were the 8 ⅜” barrel and the 6 ½” barrel. Both can be seen used in some scenes. The blanks it fired were custom made since the 5-in-1 blank didn’t fit the chambers. It is said scriptwriter John Milius as presented with one of the actual guns used in the film as a gift later on. As for Harry’s line in the film about the .44 Magnum being “the most powerful handgun in the world”, one should note that even in the 1970s, the .44 Remington Magnum cartridge had been eclipsed in size and power by the .454 Casull round, however, the first widely available commercially sold revolver chambered for the 454 Casull would not come for another ten years, so his statement for the time frame is accurate.

Harry’s use of the .44 Magnum Model 29 was both iconic and influential; the next James Bond film after Dirty Harry, Roger Moore’s first outing in Live and Let Die in 1973, featured Bond wielding the massive Model 29 during the finale, worn in a similar shoulder holster as Harry’s.

Do Yourself A Favor And…

Buy the movie.

The Quote

You’ve heard it a million times, probably bastardized, but here it is:

I know what you’re thinking. “Did he fire six shots or only five?” Well, to tell you the truth, in all this excitement I kind of lost track myself. But being as this is a .44 Magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world, and would blow your head clean off, you’ve got to ask yourself one question: Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, punk?

Harry never actually says “Do you feel lucky, punk?” in this scene.
Do you feel stupid for always quoting it that way, punk?