Tagged: The Bourne Legacy

Aaron Cross’s Winter Attire in The Bourne Legacy

Jeremy Renner as Aaron Cross in The Bourne Legacy (2012).

Jeremy Renner as Aaron Cross in The Bourne Legacy (2012).

Vitals

Jeremy Renner as Kenneth J. Kitsom, aka Aaron Cross, U.S. Department of Defense agent-in-training

Alaska, January 2005

Film: The Bourne Legacy
Release Date: August 10, 2012
Director: Tony Gilroy
Costume Designer: Shay Cunliffe

Background

The Bourne Legacy, a risky film in itself for continuing a near-perfect modern trilogy, cleverly chose to run a parallel story to that of its titular character. Overlapping the events of The Bourne Supremacy‘s final act and The Bourne UltimatumThe Bourne Legacy begins with DOD agent Aaron Cross (formerly Kenneth J. Kitsom) on a training exercise in Alaska.

(“Alaska” is portrayed in the film by The Fortress, a mounted in the Canadian Rockies just west of Calgary in Canada that rises to an elevation of 9,800 feet.)

Cross’ assignment tests his endurance and skill as he is faced with the extremity of Alaska’s chilly climate and rugged terrain. Eventually finding his way to another agent in Cross’ Operation Outcome unit, Cross is told that he has broken the mission record by two days. Unlike Bourne, who was rigorously trained to the breaking point, Cross’ skill comes from the performance-enhancing “chems” he has been given to make him a super-agent.

Much like the earlier films in the series, the plot revolves around CIA trying to wipe out its most talented – and thus most internally dangerous – operatives. In this case, a drone is sent after Cross and his contact. Though the contact is killed, Cross cleverly manages to misdirect the drone’s fire by feeding his tracking device to a wolf. When the wolf is obliterated by a drone’s Hellfire missile, Cross knows he is in danger and heads back to the continental U.S. to solve the problem.

What’d He Wear?

Similarly to the first installment in the Bourne series, our protagonist’s first outer layer is a red winter jacket. Appropriately enough, red tends to signify danger in the Bourne films, and Aaron Cross is a simply a pawn in a bigger, drone-centric game while he shoots around Alaska in his red jacket.

Cross sports an Arc'teryx Alpha SV jacket in The Bourne Legacy.

Cross sports an Arc’teryx Alpha SV jacket in The Bourne Legacy.

The jacket in question here receives much more prominence and, as an actual item of Cross’ clothing rather than something borrowed, is a much more efficient outerwear garment than the down jacket sported by Jason Bourne in Switzerland.

Cross wears a red lightweight and waterproof outdoor jacket from Arc’teryx’s Alpha SV (Severe Weather) series. It is still available from Arc’teryx’s site for $675 and has actually won several awards, including the ISPO Outdoor Award, the Backpacker Magazine‘s Lifetime Award, Outdoor Gear Lab Editor’s Choice Award, and mention on Forbes.com’s Top 5 New Winter Gear Pieces in 2013. Arc’teryx has also developed a woman’s version of the Alpha SV, but Cross naturally wears the men’s jacket.

The Arc'teryx logo, plainly visible on Cross' left chest.

The Arc’teryx logo, plainly visible on Cross’ left chest.

Constructed from durable and waterproof N80p-GORE-TEX® Pro 3L (three-layered) fabric, the Alpha SV jacket was designed specifically for climbers in “severe alpine environments”. According to Arc’teryx:

The Alpha SV first appeared in 1998 to address the needs of alpinists for a lightweight, streamlined, waterproof jacket that could work with a harness. Hard-wearing, stripped down and unlike anything else at the time, the Alpha SV quickly became an iconic Arc’teryx piece and revolutionized the outdoor apparel industry.

Arc’teryx designed their jacket to fit as comfortably as possible for the sort of outdoorsmen who would be traversing a freezing mountainside in the middle of winter. The zippers, hood, and jacket itself were all treated with DWR (Durable Water Repellent) to keep the wearer dry and warm despite extreme snow, rain, or wind outside. Despite these measures, the jacket is still very breathable and wearable with its 1.6 mm micro-seam allowance to keep it lightweight.

The jacket has three external pockets and two internal pockets, all designed to be accessible and durable. There are two bellowed “crossover” chest pockets on the front as well as a sleeve pocket on the left bicep. Inside, there are two laminated pockets. Arc’teryx is sure to note that despite the heavy water resilience of the pockets, they themselves are not waterproof and wearers should not keep “items in your pockets that may be damaged by moisture”.

The Arc'teryx features accessible and practically-placed pockets for badasses.

The Arc’teryx features accessible and practically-placed pockets for badasses.

The external zippers on the front and pockets are Arcteryx’s trademarked WaterTight™ zippers designed to seal out the window and weather with “zipper garages” providing additional protection from wet weather. The corded zipper pulls were designed to be easily accessible with one hand and quietly opened, especially useful for a government assassin like Cross trying to evade detection. (Of course, the color isn’t ideal for evading detection.)

Arc’teryx also trademarked the jacket’s hood, its “helmet compatible Stormhood™” which was designed to keep the wearer warm and dry. It has a laminated brim and hood adjusters that cinch tightly and securely to offer “full coverage without restricting movement or visibility”, another plus for someone like Cross who finds himself the target of government drones. The tall collar of the jacket enhances the hood’s “full coverage” and has a laminated chin guard for additional protection.

Even in extreme weather, the badass Cross forgoes wearing his hood in favor of his knit cap.

Even in extreme weather, Cross forgoes wearing his hood in favor of his knit cap.

While updating its milestone Alpha SV jacket, Arc’teryx focused on enhancing the fit for active men on the climb. One frequent complaint about winter jackets is that the heavy insulation restricts arm movement. The Alpha SV was redesigned to address that problem with a reduced chest circumference and closer fit, offering “more efficient arm movement” with articulated re-patterning through the jacket, particularly the elbows, for “unrestricted mobility”. The underarms are gusseted with zips to allow easier breathing through one of man’s sweatiest areas.

The sleeves have elasticized and laminated die-cut velcro cuffs. The waistline is also elasticized with an adjustable drawcord. The hem was designed with Arc’teryx’s lightweight and removable Harness HemLock™ inserts to keep the jacket in place while wearing a climbing harness, as jackets are prone to ride up otherwise.

Though the site makes no mention of it, Cross’ jacket appears to be reversible with the dark gray lining doubling as a jacket when he needs to be more discreet than a bright red jacket would allow.

Cross knows when it's time to avoid detection... and he knows red isn't the best color for such a purpose.

Cross knows when it’s time to avoid detection… and he knows red isn’t the best color for such a purpose.

At first, I wondered if this was a dark gray down jacket layered underneath the red Arc’teryx; however, scenes of Cross wearing the dark gray jacket after escaping the ill-fated cabin show the same features and pockets as the red jacket but with a red lining and red-trimmed hood.

Despite that, Cross does appear to layer a black down jacket under his red Arc’teryx, best seen when he first arrives at the cabin and talks to Outcome 3 with his outer jacket unzipped.

Cross layers his jackets for a cold trek through Alaska.

Cross layers his jackets for a cold trek through Alaska.

The sequence in Alaska features Cross’ outerwear – particularly his jacket – far more than the rest of his attire, but it appears he took a page out of the Bourne handbook and wore all black underneath.

He wears a black thermal long-sleeve quarter-zip shirt on his chest with elasticized sleeves that roll up easily onto his bicep to allow himself to inject a shot when necessary. Some long-sleeve shirts are too close-fitting throughout the sleeves to allow this sort of thing. This was also notably seen in Thunderball when Sean Connery’s Bond rolls up the sleeves of a black long-sleeve polo while stalking through Shrublands at night. In both instances, the sleeve rolled up easily onto the bicep without bunching too much or unrolling itself during the scene.

BLeg1-CL2-shirt

According to some speculation (and MC Toys’ action figure of Cross), Cross’ dark gray snow pants are Helly Hansen’s Verglas Randonee, a highly-rated model currently priced at $240 on Helly Hansen’s site described as: “A light and comfortable shell pant for backcountry adventurers. 3/4 side zips and bottom reinforcement per specification of our mountain guide friends.” While lined for comfort, the shell pants are not insulated to keep them lightweight and comfortable for an active climber. Like the Arc’teryx jacket, they’ve also been DWR treated to repel water in this extreme weather environment.

Cross hits the deck.

Cross hits the deck.

The two-ply fabric Verglas pants have an adjustable velcro waist with belt loops and double buttons. There are plenty of pockets through the articulated legs, including side “handwarmer” pockets with YKK® zippers and a slash pocket on the right thigh. A quarter-length YKK® Aquaguard® zipper extends down each side to the ballistic nylon reinforced bottoms, which close with a snap over the zipped legs.

The Helly Hansen logo appears on Cross' pant bottom snaps.

The Helly Hansen logo appears on Cross’ pant bottom snaps.

Though he wears blackened Timberland Chocorua Trail Gore-Tex hiking boots through the rest of the film, I believe the pair worn in the Alaska sequence is The North Face’s Slot GTX winter boot – also in black – constructed from Nubeck leather and Gore-Tex.

According to BackCountry.com: “The Winter Grip outsole’s secret weapon is its temperature-sensitive lugs that sharpen the colder it gets. Hunker down or push on to base camp knowing that The North Face Men’s Slot GTX Winter Boot’s PrimaLoft insulation and EVA midsole will make your feet forget it’s even winter.”

BLeg1-CL3-boots

Although he’s got the revolutionary protective hood on his jacket, Cross wisely protects his head further with a plain black winter trek knit cap.

Cross’ black gloves are a blend of fabric and synthetic material with removable finger tips.

Cross takes his chems.

Cross takes his chems.

He wears his watch, a black IWC Pilot’s Watch Double Chronograph Edition TOP GUN #IW 379901, on top of the gloves so he doesn’t have to expose his skin to check the time. With its black ceramic 46 mm case and matte gray titanium crown, buttons, and rear cover, it’s a durable watch that ably withstands the extreme temperatures of Cross’ Alaskan plight.

Nothing like a $12,000 watch to battle extreme cold.

Nothing like a $12,000 watch to battle extreme cold.

Cross stays loyal to the Arc’teryx brand by sporting a black Arc’teryx 65 backpack. More information is available from the Arc’teryx site.

My knowledge of backpacks ends here. Anything else I should add?

My knowledge of backpacks ends here. Anything else I should add?

How to Get the Look

Cross dresses solely for function here, wearing some of the highest rated winter clothing available.

BLeg1-crop

  • Red lightweight waterproof Arc’teryx Alpha SV series Gore-Tex jacket with zip front, crossover zip chest pockets, sleeve zip pocket, and laminated-brim storm hood with chin protection
  • Black hooded zip-front down jacket
  • Dark gray Helle Hansen “Verglas Randonee” lightweight shell pants with adjustable velcro/snap waist, handwarmer zip pockets, thigh zip pocket, and quarter-length zipped & reinforced bottoms
  • Black quarter-zip long-sleeve thermal shirt
  • Black knit trek cap
  • Black leather/Gore-Tex winter boots, likely The North Face’s Slot GTX
  • Black winter gloves with removable finger tips
  • IWC Pilot’s Watch Double Chronograph Edition TOP GUN (#379901), with a black ceramic 46 mm case and matte gray titanium crown, buttons, and rear cover

The Gun

Aaron Cross’ weapon in Alaska is a customized Nemesis Arms Vanquish takedown sniper rifle. According to IMFDb:

The Nemesis Arms Vanquish (also known as the Nemesis Arms Mini-Windrunner) is a lightweight, tactical, take down rifle built from a small action version of the .50 EDM Arms Windrunner M96, which was also the base rifle used in the manufacture of the Cheyenne Tactical M-200 Intervention. The Vanquish is a multi caliber rifle, and this can be changed by simply replacing the threaded barrel (all other parts including the magazine do not need to be changed). The Vanquish has been tested by Marine Scout Snipers at the High Altitude Shooting Course where they were able to hold 3 inch groups at 600 yards and 6.5 inch groups at 905 yards.

Thus, a very practical rifle for an assassin… at least from what I know by watching movies about assassins.

Cross constructs his Vanquish rifle.

Cross constructs his Vanquish rifle.

The rifle hasn’t received much exposure on screen yet, having only appeared on the weapons scene a few years before The Bourne Legacy was made. It is very lightweight, weighing twelve pounds when not fitted with optics or accessories, with a 20″ match grade and fluted barrel and optional muzzle brake. The Nemesis Arms site reports that the Vanquish can be fired with .338 Federal, .308 Winchester, .260 Remington, 6.5 Creedmoor, or .243 Winchester ammunition from a 10-round detachable box magazine.

Although the Nemesis Arms Vanquish is a bolt-action weapon, the film shows Cross using it in both bolt-action and semi-automatic modes. This is a common error seen in films (and nicely lampshaded by the Nation’s Pride film-within-a-film in Inglourious Basterds) when a bolt-action rifle is shown to fire semi-automatic rounds to speed up the action. Still, a “cool shot” is almost always included of the character rapidly racking the bolt to show just that the character is a determined badass and “gun expert”.

In this case, the rifle would likely weigh more than twelve pounds.

In this case, the rifle would likely weigh more than twelve pounds.

Cross also gets his hands on Outcome 3’s sidearm, a first generation Walther P99, when fighting off a group of wolves. The P99 was developed by Carl Walther GmbH Sportwaffen to replace its older P5 and P88 models. After three years of design, the P99 was introduced in 1997 just in time to replace the venerable but lower-caliber PPK carried by James Bond in Tomorrow Never Dies.

Well known to 007 fans as James Bond’s handgun of choice from Tomorrow Never Dies to Casino Royale, the P99 also makes its return to the Bourne series after being featured prominently as Kirill’s weapon of choice in The Bourne Supremacy. Like Kirill’s sidearm, the two-tone P99 wielded by Cross has a black polymer frame and silver polished steel slide.

BLeg2-GUN-p99

Though the P99 was initially chambered only in 9×19 mm Parabellum (with a 16-round magazine), a .40 S&W offering was soon rolled out to appeal to the American LEOs who were slowly adopting the .40-caliber round. Although the P99’s short recoil, locked breech system dates back to John Browning’s Hi-Power pistol, the weapon more resembles modern pistols like the Glock with its internal striker rather than an external hammer.

Unlike other weapons where generational changes are mostly cosmetic, it is important to differentiate between the P99’s generations. The first generation was strictly a traditional double action (DA/SA) with a decocker. Due to its lack of an external hammer, a red-painted striker tip protruding from the rear of the slide (and a loaded chamber indicator on the right side) indicates to the user when the gun is cocked.

The second generation featured many more variants: the P99 Anti-Stress (AS), which was closest to the original DA/SA generation; the P99 DAO, with a resting internal striker to keep the pistol in double-action only mode; the P99 Quick Action (QA), with a pre-loaded Glock-style internal striker; and a compact version of each of the three variants. The magazine capacities were reduced by a single round for the newer generation, carrying 15 rounds of 9×19 mm or 11 rounds of .40 S&W. The P99 remains a popular field gun due to its reliability and ease of field stripping without tools.

Do Yourself a Favor and…

Buy the movie.

Aaron Cross’s Biker Jacket in The Bourne Legacy

Jeremy Renner looking intently at something as Aaron Cross in The Bourne Legacy.

Jeremy Renner looking intently at something as Aaron Cross in The Bourne Legacy (2012).

Vitals

Jeremy Renner as Kenneth J. Kitsom, aka Aaron Cross, U.S. Department of Defense agent who does not have amnesia

Maryland and the Philippines, February 2005

Background

People anticipated the release of The Bourne Legacy with nervous excitement. Most people I knew were very satisfied with the initial Bourne trilogy, ranking it among the better movie trilogies out there. People always ask for more until they actually get it. Case in point – Star Wars, Episode I.

However, Jeremy Renner surprised many by capably filling the gigantic shoes of taking on the role of Not Matt Damon. Like Damon was in 2002, Renner is a very likable and capable actor who is getting into the meatier parts of his career, from superhero movies (The Avengers) to crime drama (The Town). Furthermore, he doesn’t have a pre-Argo Ben Affleck dragging him down!*

Thus, The Bourne Legacy was a worthwhile follow-up in a good franchise, wisely not trying to Bond-ize the series. The story is cleverly continued by overlapping the new story of Aaron Cross with the familiar story of Jason Bourne. Also, we have the only appropriate title in the series since the first installment as we are truly seeing the effects of Bourne’s legacy. I don’t recall any sort of supremacy or ultimatum in the second or third movies, so points to this one for having a title that actually makes sense.

* I have to specify pre-Argo because Argo was pretty goddamn awesome.

What’d He Wear?

Like his predecessor, Jeremy Renner’s protagonist wears one main outfit during the film, with some variation depending on extreme climates (Bourne in India, Cross in Alaska) and differing tasks. Perhaps trying to tell the audience something about CIA agents, the filmmakers also choose for Aaron Cross a dark jacket, neutral t-shirt, and dark jeans, paired with boots.

The film’s costume designer, Shay Cunliffe, is quoted with saying that Cross’s attire needs to be multi-functional. He needs “to be able to put it on, live in it, and do everything [he] needs to do.” (Thanks to “The Superbite” for the quote and a great page about Cross’s jacket.)

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And when “everything you need to do” includes jumping, fighting, and getting into motorcycle chases, you’ll want comfortable multi-functional attire.

The staple item of Cross’s character, which he takes with him from Maryland to Manila, is a black jacket. At first, I thought this was a leather biker’s jacket, especially given the extended stunt on the motorcycle. Evidently, I wasn’t the only one, nor was I too foolish for my mistake. Rather than the cool-looking but stifling leather, Aaron Cross wears a wax cotton jacket, notably a Belstaff H Racer Cardigan Jacket, made by the British brand Belstaff. Belstaff is known for their all-weather motorcyclist’s jackets and this, a wax cotton biker’s jacket, is the perfect example. After all, wouldn’t leather be a bit restricting for all of the running, jumping, fighting, and additional badassery that is required of a Bourne movie hero?

The jacket was so popular after the film that Belstaff quickly reissued it, but other retailers that jumped on the boom after the movie came out are also still selling versions, including Accent Clothing in the UK.

Belstaff's distinctive logo is present, but not distracting, on the film jacket.

Belstaff’s distinctive logo is present, but not distracting, on the film jacket.

Cross’s Belstaff jacket acknowledges the new direction of the series. Whereas Bourne’s attire was slightly more traditional, albeit still cool, Cross’s jacket is a very modern-styled garment with its slim fit and short length while still not as tight as the oft-criticized (unfairly, IMO) costumes in Skyfall.

As mentioned, the black-on-black Belstaff jacket is lightweight – moreso than it looks – due its waterproof and “rubberized” wax cotton material, layered with an internal jersey lining on the collars, cuffs, and waistband. Unlike the smoother lines of Bourne’s jackets, there are seams aplenty here, down the arms, on the yokes, and down the center of his back.

Although atypical for a biker’s jacket, it does have the articulated sleeves to enhance riding posture with aerators under the pits to add breathability without sacrificing wind protection. The sleeves fasten at the cuffs with snaps, identical to the snap tabs that offer an adjustable fit at the waist.

Further up the sleeves – or at least just the left sleeve – the Belstaff logo stands out proudly. Some may argue product placement, but I say it’s realism; how many of you take the time to cover up any potential logos on your clothing before going out for a bit of world-saving?

Although never used by Cross as he never wears the jacket closed up to the neck, the jersey-lined collar offers additional wind protection, further enhanced with a buckle-fastened archival throat latch, which fastens through a 1-eyelet silver clasp.

bourneleg-coat1

The jacket, as a biker jacket should, also has plenty of pockets. There is a slant chest pocket on the left side that closes with a zip, meant to carry – according to Belstaff – “personal essentials”. The zip pockets on the hips are vertical to keep the modern slim silhouette streamlined.

According to the Belstaff site, the H Racer Cardigan Jacket currently retails for $695. Some may consider this a lot to spend on a jacket, but it is actually comparatively low in the men’s designer outerwear market. Additionally, if you’re going to have one good all-purpose jacket, it’s worth the minor investment for quality.

Like Bourne, Cross layers his shirts to be climate-appropriate. When running through the woods of Maryland in February, Cross wears a dark gray thermal long-sleeve t-shirt with a thermal grid pattern and rib knit cuffs for warmth.

Bourne's thermal T during moments of introspection and action.

Cross’s thermal T during moments of introspection and action.

After traveling to Manila, the capital of the Philippines, Cross is now in a much warmer climate. It may be February, but the daily mean temperature in Manila in February is still 81°F. The average low? Just over 69°F. This is when it’s a good time to not be wearing a leather jacket. Or a thermal long-sleeve t-shirt.

Cross quickly ditches the thermal and runs around the Philippines in a much more comfortable light gray short-sleeve cotton t-shirt. It’s definitely a t-shirt, as we see both in the film and on the DVD cover art, but one stunt reveals that Renner actually wears a sleeveless shirt in some scenes. Even though they were filming in January, the weather was so warm that they needed to switch out his t-shirt. Of course, it doesn’t help that they stuck poor Renner in a jacket, jeans, and heavy boots with a black backpack on.

Cross was just wearing a gray t-shirt (right), so how did it magically become a sleeveless shirt (left)? Why don't I just stop being a nitpicky ass and enjoy the flick?

Cross was just wearing a gray t-shirt (right), so how did it magically become a sleeveless shirt (left)? Why don’t I just stop being a nitpicky ass and enjoy the flick?

Cross also changes his pants from the Maryland scenes to the Philippines. In Maryland, after his quick change in the woods, Cross wears a pair of comfortable black cargo pants with large snap-fastened pocket flaps on the rear pockets and the box-pleated side cargo pockets. These trousers also have belt loops, but Cross wears them with no belt.

People say cargo pants are passé, but with both Aaron Cross and Dexter Morgan preferring them, I'm not so sure anymore...

People say cargo pants are passé, but with both Aaron Cross and Dexter Morgan preferring them, I’m not so sure anymore…

Once he gets to Manila, after changing out of his suit, Cross wears a pair of Paige Denim’s Normandie slim straight leg denim jeans in a very dark blue “Manchester” wash. The jeans have a distinctive white stitching and the usual 5-pocket setup with large rear patch pockets. The Manchester wash doesn’t appear to be available from Paige anymore, but there is still a variety of Normandie style slim jeans on their site in the $169 to $229 range. There are some very good-looking styles in practical blue denim, as well as more… unique styles ranging from mustard to camouflage to hot pink.

Cross's jeans are best identified in behind-the-scenes shots, as seen on the left.

Cross’s jeans are best identified in behind-the-scenes shots, as seen on the left.

For his international adventures, Cross sports a pair of blackened gore-tex Timberland Chocorua Trail hiking boots with rubber soles. They have four eyelets for laces and two adjustable hook and loop straps to keep them tightly fit on Cross’s feet. The boots are built with premium leather uppers and a contoured EVA footbed with an antimicrobial cover to stifle foot odors. These boots are still available on the Timberland website for $140, but only in brown. Older pairs in black – like Cross’s – can be picked up on other sites like Amazon for a few bucks less. Let’s go ahead and say he wears a pair of black socks with these. I don’t think we see his socks, but black makes sense, right? Okay, we’re going with that.

So they look black when he first puts them on, but they have turned brown by the time he hijacks a motorcycle in Manila? Or are they just dirty? Or did the filmmakers blacken a pair of brown boots? I am so confused.

So they look black when he first puts them on, but they have turned brown by the time he hijacks a motorcycle in Manila? Or are they just dirty? Or did the filmmakers blacken a pair of brown boots? I am so confused.

While we’re on the subject of undergarments (which socks kind of are), Cross flashes a pair of white boxer briefs with a black elastic waistband while rolling across the roofs of Manila. I can’t make out the logo on the waistband, but someone with eagle eyes (or a computer hooked up to a Blu-Ray player) might have more success.

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Cross takes Dr. Marta to the airport for their flight to Manila wearing a new and decidedly un-Bourne-like layer, a simple but cool Steve McQueen-style khaki trench coat. The raincoat is single-breasted with large shirt-style collars, button-tab cuffs, and a horizontal seam across the upper back. We don’t see the trench coat before or after the airport scenes, but it adds a neat dimension to an already cool look.

Yes, Jeremy, Steve McQueen would like your coat.

Yes, Jeremy, Steve McQueen would approve of your coat.

Adding to the cool factor is a pair of Ray-Ban RB 2140 Wayfarers, worn by Cross during the final chase. These are the genuine Ray-Ban sunglasses made iconic in the ’80s and undergoing a revival now. Cross’s are a set of RB2140-02s with black plastic frames and G-15® XLT Polarized Polarized lenses. If you want a pair, and I know you do, you can head to the Ray-Ban site and pick up yours today for $200.

It's hard not to look cool in a pair of Ray-Ban Wayfarers. (But not impossible...)

It’s hard not to look cool in a pair of Ray-Ban Wayfarers. (But not impossible…)

Or, if you’re a lucky bastard like me, you’ll find a pair and not have to pay a dime for them. It was a particularly cold February day in 2010, a few days after the legendary “snowmageddon” that stranded many Pittsburghers in their homes for days on end. I was in my marketing classroom, having just heard a presentation about the new Consol Energy Center which was six months away from opening. The lecture ended and I was lingering, flirting with some sorority whats-her-name, when I noticed a pair of sunglasses on a neighboring desk. My first thought was, “Hey, cool, sunglasses!” My second thought was, “Holy shit, these are Ray-Bans.” I still have them three years later. The poor sucker who lost them never had a chance.

Finally, Cross wears the accessory that no modern spy movie is complete without – a wristwatch. Cross’s is a black IWC Pilot’s Watch Double Chronograph Edition TOP GUN, #IW 379901, with a black ceramic 46 mm case and matte gray titanium crown, buttons, and rear cover. It’s a beautiful watch and you can spend 12,700 beautiful dollars to obtain it.

The watch shown here is especially useful on Monday the 25th. Double points if it's 10:08.

The watch shown here is especially useful on Monday the 25th. Double points if it’s 10:08.

Go Big or Go Home

Although he has cool accessories with his watch and sunglasses, the rest of Aaron’s inventory is pretty simple. His laptop is a standard black Toshiba, he uses a red Sharpie, and – in the most anti-Bond fashion – his camera is a disposable Kodak FunSaver Flash. This rings pretty true for the film’s supposed setting of 2005, when digital cameras were just emerging onto the marketplace and the quickest way for a guy on the lam to snap a photo was with a disposable camera. I myself went through probably twenty disposable cameras during the summer of 2005 alone. Cross also carries a silver Zippo, utilizing it to move the film into its second act.

Also, unlike Bourne who seemed to have bottomless pockets for his equipment much like a video game character, Cross carries a large backpack around Manila, ostensibly filled with his belongings. Hopefully for Jeremy Renner, it wasn’t actually full in real life.

How to Get the Look

Cross may have some expensive taste, but you can find some inexpensive (or just plain cheap) options since you don’t need the durability of a man who has to leap across roofs or get into life-or-death motorcycle chases. It might be fun to think that this is your life, but let’s be practical here.

Unless situations like these are common for you, I doubt you need to really go out for durability.

Unless situations like these are common for you, I doubt you need to really go out for durability.

  • Black lightweight wax cotton biker’s jacket with slash zip left chest pocket, vertical zip side pockets, jersey-lined collar with silver buckle-fastened throat latch, snap cuffs, and adjustable waist snaps – Cross’s jacket is a Belstaff H Racer Cardigan Jacket
  • Light khaki single-breasted trench coat with large shirt-style collars and button-tab cuffs
  • Dark gray thermal long-sleeve crew neck t-shirt
  • Light gray cotton short-sleeve crew neck t-shirt
  • Very dark blue denim jeans with white stitching – Cross’s jeans are Paige Denim’s Normandie in Manchester wash
  • Black cargo pants with belt loops and large flapped rear and cargo pockets
  • Black gore-tex hiking boots with leather uppers, rubber soles, 4 eyelets, and 2 hook straps – Cross wears Timberland Chocorua Trail boots
  • Black socks
  • White boxer briefs with a black elastic waistband
  • Ray-Ban RB 2140-02 Wayfarer sunglasses with black plastic frames and polarized lenses
  • IWC Pilot’s Watch Double Chronograph Edition TOP GUN (#379901), with a black ceramic 46 mm case and matte gray titanium crown, buttons, and rear cover

The Gun

This is a badass Jason Bourne action movie, so there are gonna be plenty of guns. In this movie, Aaron Cross handles a Nemesis Arms Vanquish sniper rifle, a SIG-Sauer P229, a Glock 19, a Beretta 92FS, and a Smith & Wesson Model 10 revolver – the first notable revolver in the Bourne series. He may use all of these guns, but right now I’ll focus on one we haven’t seen before on this blog, the SIG-Sauer P229.

SIG-Sauer seems to be the CIA’s manufacturer of choice in the Bourne series; Jason kept a SIG Pro in his Swiss safety deposit box and carried a P225 throughout The Bourne Supremacy, The Professor used a SIG SG 550 rifle to take out his targets, and Paz armed himself with a SIG SG 552 and a P229 in the last installment of the original trilogy. In The Bourne Legacy, Cross packs the P229 when he heads into battle in Dr. Shearing’s Maryland country home. He eventually gets his hands on Dr. Dowd’s Glock 19 and carries both akimbo, but it is the P229 that is Cross’s weapon of choice.

The SIG-Sauer P229 is the one in Cross's left hand. In his right hand, he holds Dr. Dowd's Glock 19.

The SIG-Sauer P229 is the one in Cross’s left hand. In his right hand, he holds Dr. Dowd’s Glock 19. Notice the smooth section of the frame in front of the trigger guard, indicating that this is not a P229R, which has an accessory rail.

The SIG-Sauer P229, which you can still check out on SIG-Sauer’s online catalog, was introduced in 1991 as a compact version of the P226. Two years earlier, SIG-Sauer had developed the P228 for the same purpose, but the P228 was already nearly obsolete as it would chamber only 9×19 mm Parabellum. The P229, on the other hand, was made to handle the higher velocity .357 SIG and .40 S&W rounds also offered in the larger P226 due to the heavier CNC Machined steel slide unavailable on the P228. Once the P229 was also offered in 9×19 mm, the P228 sadly bowed out of production after a short but glamorous life as the “M11″ in U.S. government service.

The P229 marked a new generation for SIG-Sauer’s prominent place in U.S. law enforcement. While the P226 and P228 had been adopted by some agencies, the P229 was meant to be an American pistol and was the first SIG to be manufactured in Exeter, NH. The U.S. Secret Service now carries P229R DAK in .357 SIG, and both the Department of Homeland Security and the Coast Guard carry .40-caliber P229s. The P229R DAK (the R indicates an accessory rail in front of the trigger guard) uses SIG-Sauer’s Double Action Kellerman system, a DAO system with a smoother, lighter pull and two reset points.

The P229 carried by Bourne has a traditional DA/SA system, with a trigger pull of 10.0 lbs. in double action and 4.4 lbs. in single action. His is the non-rail P229, except for one brief shot when he is hiding in Marta’s closet and the pistol becomes a P229R due to a continuity error.

This SIG-Sauer has an accessory rail, making its appearance a continuity error. Man, even Jeremy Renner looks embarrassed by the mistake here.

This SIG-Sauer has an accessory rail, making its appearance a continuity error. Man, even Jeremy Renner looks embarrassed by the mistake here.

The P229 is 7.1 inches long, 5.4 inches high, and 1.5 inches wide. The barrel length of 3.9 inches makes it a fine weapon for both concealment and combat, especially with its relatively light 32 ounce weight when loaded with 13 rounds of 9×19 mm ammunition (or 12 rounds of .40 S&W/.357 SIG). SIG-Sauer offers the pistol for $993, a high price when there are similar pistols on the market, but SIG-Sauer has built a reputation for quality that can stand behind its price.

The SIG-Sauer P229, pistol of choice for CIA assassins (according to the movies). Image from IMFDB, a great resource for firearms enthusiasts, movie enthusiasts, and firearms-in-movies enthusiasts.

The SIG-Sauer P229, pistol of choice for CIA assassins (according to the movies). Image from IMFDB, a great resource for firearms enthusiasts, movie enthusiasts, and firearms-in-movies enthusiasts.

On film, the P229 first appeared on screen in the hands of Jonathan Pryce as the villain Elliot Carver in Tomorrow Never Dies. The P228 is still much more common in film, as it was developed earlier and is only chambered in 9×19 mm Parabellum, which is much more common in Hollywood blank ammunition arsenals.

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The Quotes

Now, I’ve got a plan, and it’s just not that complicated. What I’m going to do is wait for the next person to show up to kill you. Maybe they can help me.

Jason Bourne wasn't much of a sweet-talker either, but a woman never likes hearing something like this. Just ask Richard Speck.

Jason Bourne wasn’t much of a sweet-talker either, but a woman never likes hearing something like this. Just ask Richard Speck.